Saturday, June 24, 2017

UAE running 'informal detention centres' in Yemen, Eritrea; children among detainees: HRW





Beirut: The United Arab Emirates runs at least two "informal detention facilities" in Yemen and has reportedly transferred detainees to a base in Eritrea, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said on Thursday.
The UAE is a key member of a Saudi-led military coalition that entered Yemen's conflict in 2015 to battle on the government's side against Iran-backed Huthi rebels.
Representational image. Getty Images

Representational image. Getty Images
HRW said UAE officials appeared to have "moved high-profile detainees outside the country" including to a base in Eritrea.
The rights group said it had documented 49 cases, including those of four children, who had been "arbitrarily detained or forcibly disappeared" - at least 38 of them by UAE-backed forces.
The New York-based group said the UAE also runs detention facilities in southern provinces home to Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and a local affiliate of the Islamic State group.
Children are among those detained in the centres, it said.
It said Shiite Huthi rebels and their allies, forces loyal to former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, had also "arbitrarily detained and disappeared scores of people in northern Yemen".
The World Health Organization estimates more than 8,000 people have been killed in two years of conflict in Yemen, which also faces a deadly cholera outbreak and the threat of famine.
All parties in Yemen's war have drawn harsh criticism for causing civilian suffering.
The United Nations and HRW have said air strikes by the Saudi-led alliance have killed many civilians and may amount to war crimes.


Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Tension Rises Between Djibouti and Eritrea Following Qatar Forces Depature


eritrea-djibouti-tension-risesJune 19, 2017 - A decades-long border dispute in the Doumeira region that, on occasion, had turned violent, was dampened in 2010 when the two sides agreed to let Qatar mediate. Since then, 450 Qatari forces have been maintaining a buffer zone between the two sides – until they up and left last week.
Qatar offered no explanation for the move, though it comes amid a diplomatic dispute with other Arab nations, most notably the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, which have cut diplomatic ties and are now trying to isolate Qatar from the rest of the world. Saudi Arabia and its allies allege that Qatar supports Islamist extremists, a charge the small gulf nation denies.
Both Djibouti and Eritrea have good relations with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, and have taken their side in the Gulf row.
Djibouti says that, in the absence of Qatari soldiers, Eritrea has once again occupied the disputed territory, and hints that military clashes are not out of the question.
Foreign Minister Mahamoud Ali Youssouf warned that Djibouti's military were "on alert" and said the nation has lodged complaints to the UN and the African Union (AU). The AU urged restraint and said it would send a fact-finding mission to the disputed border.
It’s possible that the disputed Doumeira region won’t be the only place where the troubles with Qatar will be felt.
"The Qataris are involved in a number of fields outside their immediate region,” H.A. Hellyer, senior non-resident fellow at the Atlantic Council in Washington DC, told FRANCE 24. “Many of those pressuring Qatar via these various measures are as well – and many times, they interact. There are probably very many arenas like the Djibouti-Eritrea scenario, and if this crisis in the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) continues we may see many more such abrupt disruptions."
Territorial tensions between the two Horn of Africa nations flared in 1996 and 1999, but the current crises dates back to 2008, when Eritrea sent its troops into the area, which lies north of the city of Djibouti and is strategically located at the entry to the Red Sea.
The dispute triggered several days of fighting that killed a dozen Djiboutian troops and wounded dozens. Eritrea had initially denied making any incursions, accusing Djibouti of launching unprovoked attacks.
After the UN Security Council requested both sides withdraw from the area, Qatar stepped in to mediate and deploy peacekeepers.
Diplomatic sources said Saturday that the UN Security Council would meet Monday afternoon in New York to discuss the crisis in a closed-door meeting requested by Ethiopia. The AU said it was "ready to assist Djibouti and Eritrea to normalise their relations and promote good neighbourliness within the framework of relevant AU instruments".
Djibouti is a close Western ally, hosts French and US military bases and is the main route to the sea for Eritrea's arch foe and Washington's top regional ally, Ethiopia.
Eritrea has fractious ties with the West, which had previously accused it of backing Somali and other regional insurgents. The government denies the charges.
Whether both parties are ready to negotiate is not entirely clear. In a statement issued Saturday, Eritrea did not directly respond to the allegations that it had invaded Djiboutian territory, saying only that the nation would not respond to "news – factual and speculative – churned out in the last few days".
"The government of Eritrea will make its views known when it obtains full information of the entire episode," said a statement issued by the information ministry in Asmara.
Djibouti has been more forthcoming. "Djibouti is a peaceful country and we have prioritised diplomatic solutions, but if Eritrea insists in seeking military solutions, Djibouti is ready for that," Youssouf said.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Ethiopia seeks UN intervention to prevent escalation of tensions

Ethiopia calls for calm in Eritrea-Djibouti border dispute - Xinhua | English.news.cn







File photo shows representatives of 13 United Nations member states vote in favor of a draft resolution on Eritrea during the UN Security Council meeting at the UN headquarters in New York, the United States, Dec. 5, 2011. (Xinhua/Shen Hong)
ADDIS ABABA, June 18 (Xinhua) -- Ethiopia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA) has called for calm in the border dispute between the two red sea nations of Eritrea and Djibouti, with which it shares common border.
The statement from regional heavyweight Ethiopia on Sunday will be keenly watched as the landlocked nation of 100 million people used to utilize Eritrean ports for its import and export trade 20 years ago.
That changed when a border war between Ethiopia and Eritrea from 1998-2000 which cost around 70,000 lives on both sides saw Ethiopia lose access to Eritrean ports and instead rely on Djiboutian ports.
Ethiopia views its access to Djiboutian ports, through which about 95 percent of its external trade passes through, as a national security issue, raising fears the Eritrea-Djibouti border dispute could turn into a conflict involving Ethiopia.
Ethiopia's current non-permanent membership in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) has also raised speculations about Ethiopia's role in the scheduled Monday meeting of UNSC to discuss the Eritrea-Djibouti border tensions.
Ethiopia's statement also supported Saturday's African Union (AU) Chairperson Moussa FakiMahamat statement calling for a deployment of fact finding mission to the disputed area.
Djibouti has appealed to the AU and UNSC to resolve the border dispute, while accusing Eritrea of moving its troops to the disputed territory.
A border dispute between Eritrea and Djibouti resulted in armed clashes in June 2008, leaving several people dead from both sides.
A mediation effort led by the Gulf Kingdom of Qatar in 2010 led to a Qatari peacekeeping force being stationed in the Eritrea-Djibouti border.
Tensions between Eritrea and Djibouti resurfaced after a 450 strong Qatari peacekeeping force stationed in their common border left the area abruptly on Wednesday.
The Qatari troops left the Eritrea-Border Djibouti after Eritrea signaled its support for Saudi Arabia led efforts to isolate Qatar.
Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrain and United Arab Emirates have accused Qatar of supporting terrorism and severed ties earlier this month.
Qatar has denied the charge but its ties to regional Saudi rival Iran and support for various Islamist groups has put it at odds with fellow Gulf region countries.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

AU calls for calm amid Djibouti-Eritrea border tensions | Djibouti News | Al Jazeera




African Union says it will send a 'fact-finding mission' to the countries as tensions between the neighbours mount.



Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker




The African Union (AU) has urged Djibouti and Eritrea to show "restraint" as tensions over a disputed border territory intensified and threatened to revive a long-standing and at times violent dispute.
Djibouti on Friday accused Eritrean soldiers of occupying territory in the contested Doumeira region following the departure of Qatari peacekeepers from the location earlier this week.
Doumeira is situated northeast of Djibouti and east of Eritrea near the Bab-el-Mandeb Strait, a strategic waterway at the foot of the Red Sea through which nearly four million barrels of oil are shipped daily to Europe, the United States and Asia.
Moussa Faki Mahamat, AU commission chairperson, said on Saturday that the union would send a "fact-finding mission to the Djibouti-Eritrea border".
The AU is "ready to assist Djibouti and Eritrea to normalise their relations and promote good neighbourliness within the framework of relevant AU instruments," he said.
Qatar announced that it was pulling its contingent out on June 14, days after the two East African countries sided with Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and their allies in a major diplomatic standoff with Doha.
Qatar's foreign ministry did not give a reason for the move.
Djibouti's Foreign Minister Mahamoud Ali Youssef said on Friday that his country's army was "on alert" and accused Eritrea of "moving its forces" into the Doumeira region where Qatari peacekeepers had been stationed since 2010 as a buffer between the two nations' armies.
In a statement issued on Saturday, Eritrea did not address the allegations directly, saying it would not respond to "news - factual and speculative - churned out in the last few days".
"The government of Eritrea will make its views known when it obtains full information of the entire episode," said the statement issued by the information ministry in Asmara.
Djibouti, a close Western ally, has repeatedly clashed with Eritrea over the disputed territory, raising fears that the spat could engulf the entire region.
Clashes broke out between the Horn of Africa countries in June 2008, which triggered several days of fighting that killed a dozen Djiboutian troops.
Eritrea had initially denied making any incursions, accusing Djibouti of launching unprovoked attacks.
The UN Security Council then requested both sides withdraw from the area before the neighbours accepted a Qatari request to mediate and deploy peacekeepers.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Djibouti accuses Eritrea of occupying disputed area | Djibouti News | Al Jazeera



Official says Eritrean soldiers occupied moved contested border territory, days after Qatar pulled its peacekeepers out.



Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker




Djibouti's foreign minister has accused neighbouring Eritrea of occupying a disputed territory along their border shortly after Qatar peacekeepers left the location this week.
Mahamoud Ali Youssouf said on Friday that Djibouti's military was "on alert" and that it has lodged complaints to the United Nations and the African Union.
"Qatari peacekeepers withdrew on June 12 and 13. On the same day, there were Eritrean military movements on the mountain," Ali Youssouf told the Reuters news agency.
"They are now in full control of Dumeira Mountain and Dumeira Island. This is in breach of the UN Security Council resolution," he added, referring to areas that the neighbours dispute.
Authorities in Eritrea were not immediately available for comment.
Qatar announced that it was pulling its contingent out on June 14, days after the two East African countries sided with Saudi Arabia and its allies in a major diplomatic standoffwith Doha.
Qatar's foreign ministry did not give a reason for the move.
On June 5, a Saudi-led bloc of countries announced they were cutting ties with Qatar, accusing it of supporting "terrorists" - allegations Doha strongly denies.
Djibouti, a close Western ally, hosts French and US military bases and is the main route to the sea for Eritrea's arch foe and Washington's top regional ally, Ethiopia.
Eritrea has fractious ties with the West, which had previously accused it of backing Somali and other regional armed groups. Asmara denies the charges.
According to Abdullahi Boru Halakh, a Horn of Africa analyst, the territorial dispute at the border "has always been there, but for the past years Qatari forces that had been deployed there had kept peace". 
Speaking from the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, he argued that Eritrea is trying to take advantage of the Gulf crisis.
"Eritrea is in the cold and under UN sanctions," he told Al Jazeera.
"They also have a territorial dispute with Ethiopia which has been simmering for years. The UN ruled in favour of Eritrea, but the ruling has not been enforced. Eritrea now sees this as an opportunity to come back from the cold and maybe get aid from the UN which it desperately needs."
Clashes broke out between the Horn of Africa countries in June, 2008, after Djibouti accused Eritrea of moving troops across the border, raising fears the spat could engulf the entire region.
The dispute triggered several days of fighting that killed a dozen Djiboutian troops and wounded dozens.
Eritrea had initially denied making any incursions, accusing Djibouti of launching unprovoked attacks.
The UN Security Council then requested both sides withdraw from the area, before the neighbours accepted a Qatari request to mediate and deploy peacekeepers.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Ethiopia: [MUST WATCH!] የግንቦት 7 ታጋዮች የነበሩ ወጣቶች አስገራሚ ታሪክ - ENN

Qatar Pulls All Its Troops From Djibouti-Eritrea Border /US News

The Associated Press

FILE - In this Thursday Jan. 6, 2011 file photo, a traditional dhow floats in the Corniche Bay of Doha, Qatar, with tall buildings of the financial district in the background. Qatar says it has pulled all of its troops from the border of Djibouti and Eritrea, East African nations that have a long-running territorial dispute which Doha had helped mediate. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das, File) THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
By MALAK HARB and ELIAS MESERET, Associated Press
DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Qatar said Wednesday it has pulled all of its troops from the border of Djibouti and Eritrea, east African nations that have a long-running territorial dispute which Doha had helped mediate.
Qatar offered no explanation for the move, though it comes amid a diplomatic dispute with other Arab nations that have cut diplomatic ties and now are trying to isolate Qatar from the rest of the world.
While the dispute hasn't escalated to a military confrontation, Qatar's military is dwarfed by neighboring Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, two of its biggest opponents in the crisis.
The 450 Qatari troops controlled a mountainous border crossing between Eritrea and Djibouti, said Nasredin Ali, a spokesman for Eritrea's biggest armed group, known as the Red Sea Afar Democratic Organization. Eritrean forces moved in after the troops departed, Ali said.
Eritrea's top diplomat to the African Union, Araya Desta, told The Associated Press the move came after Eritrea cut diplomatic ties to Qatar. However, Desta said his country wanted no confrontation with Djibouti.
"We don't want to take any of Djibouti's land," Araya said. "The last time we had some skirmishes. It was unnecessary."
Doha mediated the conflict between the two countries in 2010. Gulf nations have stationed troops in both African countries, using that as a jumping-off point for the ongoing Saudi-led war in Yemen.
Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain have accused Qatar of supporting terrorism and severed ties with Doha last week. Qatar denies the allegations, but its ties to Iran and embrace of various Islamist groups have put the country under intense scrutiny.
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres spoke to Kuwait's Deputy Prime Minister Sheikh Sabah Al-Khalid Al-Sabah on Wednesday and expressed "full support for Kuwait's efforts to de-escalate tensions and to promote effective dialogue" to resolve the crisis, U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.
In Geneva, the United Nations human rights chief said Wednesday he is "alarmed about the possible impact" of a diplomatic rift in the Persian Gulf on people's lives.
"It is becoming clear that the measures being adopted are overly broad in scope and implementation, and have the potential to seriously disrupt the lives of thousands of women, children and men," said Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein.
After cutting ties with Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain also ordered Qatari residents out though on Sunday, officials said there would be exceptions for mixed-nationality families.
Al-Hussein said these measures do not sufficiently address all cases and expressed alarm that the UAE and Bahrain have threatened to jail and fine people who express sympathy for Qatar online.
Bahrain's public prosecutor said Wednesday a citizen was detained for questioning over expressions of criticism at the country's stance toward Qatar.
Also Wednesday, Saudi Arabia blocked access to Qatar's state TV website in the latest move by the kingdom to isolate the tiny Gulf country. The kingdom said the website was blocked because it violates the rules of the Ministry of Culture and Information.
Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain have also barred new subscriptions and imports of satellite decoders for the Qatari-owned beIN Media Group, which includes sports and movie channels.
The three countries, along with Egypt, have already blocked access to Qatar's Al Jazeera Arabic news channel and its affiliate websites. Saudi Arabia has also revoked Al Jazeera's operating license.
Meanwhile, top donors trying to relieve the humanitarian crisis engulfing war-torn Syria met in Doha on Wednesday. Countries have pledged $6 billion to help Syria, but so far only 22 percent of that has been funded, said Marcy Vigoda of the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.
I'm "taking this opportunity to request this top donor group to use your leverage, to use your influence ... to ensure that pledges are turned into commitments," Vigoda said.
___
Meseret reported from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Associated Press writers Jon Gambrell and Aya Batrawy in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and Edith Lederer at the U.N. contributed to this report.
Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Eritrea sides with Gulf nations against Qatar






A picture of the entrance to a terminal hall at the Hamad International Airport in Doha, Qatar, on Monday. Eritrea has thrown its support behind Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt, which have suspended ties with Qatar over the emirate's alleged support for extremists, banning all flights to and from the capital Doha and shutting down the offices of the country's national carrier. (AFP / KARIM JAAFAR)
DOHA, Qatar: Eritrea has expressed support for Saudi Arabia and its allies after they cut ties with Qatar.

The Eritrean Information Ministry’s statement of support on Monday came despite its previously close ties with energy-rich Qatar.

The statement said the initiative by Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates “is not confined to Qatar alone as the potential of Qatar is very limited,” but is “one initiative among many in the right direction that envisages full realization of regional security and stability.”

The three countries along with Bahrain cut ties to Qatar last week over alleged Qatari support for Islamic extremists. Along with Bahrain, they have moved to block air, land and sea routes to the energy-rich Gulf nation.

Both Saudi and Qatari officials appear to be seeking support from Ethiopia. Qatari officials met Monday with Ethiopia’s prime minister and Saudi officials visited the Ethiopian capital over the weekend.

Qatar has remained defiant as the dispute worsened, Its foreign minister, Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani, is welcoming diplomatic efforts to calm the standoff, but insists that no one can dictate its foreign policy.

Al Thani said Monday that Qatar is in contact with international aviation authorities and legal organizations as it tries to fight back against moves by Saudi Arabia and its allies to cut off its land, air and sea access.

Speaking after diplomatic meetings in Paris, Al Thani said Qatar is ready to negotiate anything “related to the collective security of the Gulf countries” but insisted that Qatari foreign policy is not open to debate.

He also said “no one has the right” to pressure Qatar to silence TV network Al Jazeera, which is based in Doha.

Al Thani has visited multiple European countries in recent days seeking diplomatic support.

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Eritrea rejects cutting ties with Qatar

Eritrea rejects cutting ties with Qatar: "Eritrea rejects cutting ties with Qatar African nation says it has strong ties ‘with brother Doha’ home > middle east, africa 10.06.2017 Ayşe Hümeyra Atılgan Istanbul related news Middle East Crisis: Pakistan walks a delicate terrain Hamas leader: Arab differences are internal affairs Moscow ‘ready’ to help resolve Gulf crisis Behind diplomatic crisis: LNG war between Qatar and US Turkish products hit Qatar shelves as blockade remains By Enes Kanli ASMARA, Eritrea Eritrea on Friday declined a rewquest by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to cut diplomatic ties with Qatar. The African nation’s foreign ministry said in a written statement it "rejected" the demand to cut ties "with brother Doha". It ssid Eritrea had "strong ties with the brother people of Qatar," and it was "impossible to cut ties". Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Yemen -- abruptly cut diplomatic ties with Qatar earlier this week, accusing Doha of supporting terrorism. Mauritania added its name to the list the following day, while Jordan downgraded its diplomatic relations with Doha. Saudi Arabia also closed its land borders with Qatar, geographically isolating the tiny Gulf state. Qatar strongly rejected accusations it supports terrorist groups and called for a diplomatic solution to growing tensions between Gulf states. Anadolu Agency website contains only a portion of the news stories offered to subscribers in the AA News Broadcasting System (HAS), and in summarized form. Please contact us for subscription options. Facebook Twitter "



'via Blog this'

BREAKING - ወደ ኢትዮጵያ ሸሽተው የገቡትን የግንቦት 7 አባላት ኢ ኤን ኤን አነጋገሯቸዋል - ENN News

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Renewing The Mandate Of The UN Special Rapporteur In Eritrea | Human Rights Watch